I Charged Too Little to Mow the Lawn

After the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009, my friend and I decided to start a landscaping business. Neither of us had gone to landscaping school nor did we have a particular affinity for lawn-mowers. (At least, not yet.) But hey, we thought, we live in Florida, grass grows like crazy most of the year, and, like haircuts, lawn mowing is pretty recession-proof. More importantly, we would be “business owners” instead of restaurant waiters. Continue reading “I Charged Too Little to Mow the Lawn”

James Buchanan: Surprisingly, Politicians Are Humans

With a simple discussion on how stuff gets done in the political arena, it is easy to understand why it’s so hard to achieve the intended outcomes of that “stuff.” Everything is riddled with side-deals, loopholes, and compromises that detract or cause larger problems than the one(s) they are trying to solve. Continue reading “James Buchanan: Surprisingly, Politicians Are Humans”

James Buchanan: Surprisingly, Politicians Are Humans

With a simple discussion on how stuff gets done in the political arena, it is easy to understand why it’s so hard to achieve the intended outcomes of that “stuff.” Everything is riddled with side-deals, loopholes, and compromises that detract or cause larger problems than the one(s) they are trying to solve. Continue reading “James Buchanan: Surprisingly, Politicians Are Humans”

The Economics of the “Return Trip Effect”

Have you ever walked to a particular location, say a friend’s house, and found that the walk actually was a lot farther than you had expected, making it quite the unpleasant walk? But, you found that on the way back the walk seemed to go by much more quickly? There’s a scientific name term for this. It’s called the “return trip effect” (RTE). Continue reading “The Economics of the “Return Trip Effect””