Do We Talk So Good or Sowell?

The first day of class is always nerve-racking. You can typically tell within the first few minutes how the rest of the semester will go. If the professor cracks some jokes, hands out the syllabus, and lets you out early, then you’ll probably be in for a good next few months. Other times, your worst fears come true when the professor hands out the syllabus and then proceeds to lecture for the remaining two and a half hours. Continue reading “Do We Talk So Good or Sowell?”

Cake, To-Go Boxes, and Diminishing Marginal Returns

My friends are the worst! This past Memorial Day weekend, my three roommates decided to treat themselves to a trip to Founding Farmers and indulge in some dessert. Their decision was fairly spontaneous, which meant I already had previous plans. Determined to make me regret my choice, throughout the afternoon they sent me picture after picture of their desserts.  Continue reading “Cake, To-Go Boxes, and Diminishing Marginal Returns”

What You Can’t See, Even When Looking Both Ways

I remember my first car accident vividly. I was making a left hand turn out of the parking lot and didn’t come to a complete stop. I was already turning when I saw the blue F-150 driving straight towards me. I stepped on my brakes. Too late. My body jolted forward as the F-150 hit my little black car. Sitting in the front seat, I tried to contain the rising panic, my hands shaking.  What would my parents think? If only I had waited just half a second longer…

Continue reading “What You Can’t See, Even When Looking Both Ways”

What I Didn’t Know About Adam Smith

Last year, when I was in the horrible, awful process of moving, I had an assortment of unwanted textbooks, clothes, and furniture that combined was worth over $1,000.  I faced two options. I could take pictures of all my items and upload them to eBay or Craiglist or even Facebook Marketplace to sell them for what they were worth. Or I could sell my textbooks to my friend who was taking the same class in the fall at a heavily discounted rate. My pockets would not be as full, but I would be helping out a fellow classmate. Faced with these two options, I texted my friend and sold my textbooks to her.  Combined with a couple other sales, I walked away from my unwanted things for a grand total of little more than $200. Continue reading “What I Didn’t Know About Adam Smith”

We’re All in this Together? Mises and Team USA

Team USA didn’t win gold medals at the Olympics. Team USA didn’t participate in figure skating, luge, curling, or half pipe. Before you stop reading, let me explain.

Chloe Kim, a snowboarder from California, won gold in the half pipe through her dedication, hard work, and talent. She also won us over with her Twitter feed. The Shibutani twins competed in ice dancing and won bronze for their stellar choreography and coordination. All of the athletes earned a spot to compete under one flag and to win rare, circular stones on a string through their dedication and action.

Continue reading “We’re All in this Together? Mises and Team USA”

Elinor Ostrom and the Case of the Black Kettle

When I moved into my house last August, the first thing I noticed about the kitchen was a blue kettle with a black bottom, sitting on the stove. Even from afar, I could tell the kettle was dirty.  The color was faded from grease stains and overuse.  It was dinghy, but I still loved how it added color to the kitchen.  Continue reading “Elinor Ostrom and the Case of the Black Kettle”

It Matters How You Get There: McFadden and the Metro

If you live in the city like me, public transportation is a way of life. It helps you go from point A to point B without having to own a car. Since moving to DC, I have discovered many alternative modes of transportation. I have the option to walk without having to pay a dime. I can also take the bus or metro rail system for a low fare rate, relatively quickly* (*see Metro complaints). Continue reading “It Matters How You Get There: McFadden and the Metro”