Sock Exchanges and the Utility of Gift Giving

Happy holidays and Merry Christmas! Do you struggle with getting the right gift? Maybe it’s because of utility! Kathryn and Kenzi discuss how economics helps us understand why giving gifts is just so hard and why every gift exchange should include socks. 

Music Credit: https://www.purple-planet.com

Bacon and Elasticities

What’s your favorite breakfast food? In this episode of Katallaxy, Kathryn and Kenzi discuss the elasticities of breakfast. After this episode, Kenzi is debating whether she needs to hold an intervention for Kathryn’s obsession with bacon. Listen in to discover just one more way economics applies to your daily life.

Continue reading “Bacon and Elasticities”

Online Dating and Economics

Kathryn and Kenzi invite you to listen to ReasonablEconomics’ very first podcast. They share stories, advice, commentary on recent events, and lots of economic jargon. Leave your comments below: feedback is necessary for the growth and development of any functioning society, as Adam Smith says! Continue reading “Online Dating and Economics”

Sh*t Economists Say Part 2

Do you sometimes talk to your economist friends and they say something that leaves you scratching your head? Maybe you feel like you’ll never understand the words coming out of those econ nerds’ mouths. Don’t worry, we have the solution! Below we have provided some helpful translations, so you too can throw around confusing jargon with ease: Continue reading “Sh*t Economists Say Part 2”

Collier’s Hope for the Syrians

He shifted uncomfortably on the hospital bed as we walked in. His eyes avoided ours. The doctor told us they were reconstructing his leg.  I tried not to stare at the hospital blanket, wondering what lay underneath. The rest of my travel group peppered his mother with questions. Since arriving in Israel had they heard any news about their hometown, their community? Was it safe to return? Were her other children and her husband alive? She didn’t have answers. The doctor explained to us that as Syrian refugees, while the boy and his mother are receiving care in the Israeli hospital, they are not allowed to leave their hospital room or receive news from outside for their own safety and security. Continue reading “Collier’s Hope for the Syrians”

Miss Congeniality? Meet Miss Polycentricity.

I don’t like politics.

No, seriously, I don’t like politics! I mean, yes, I live just outside of Washington, DC. I worked in Congress this summer. Everything I learn in class seems to relate to political theory.  All my close friends and I do is discuss politics and political theory in our free time. But I swear I don’t – oh who am I kidding? Continue reading “Miss Congeniality? Meet Miss Polycentricity.”

Do We Talk So Good or Sowell?

The first day of class is always nerve-racking. You can typically tell within the first few minutes how the rest of the semester will go. If the professor cracks some jokes, hands out the syllabus, and lets you out early, then you’ll probably be in for a good next few months. Other times, your worst fears come true when the professor hands out the syllabus and then proceeds to lecture for the remaining two and a half hours. Continue reading “Do We Talk So Good or Sowell?”

Cake, To-Go Boxes, and Diminishing Marginal Returns

My friends are the worst! This past Memorial Day weekend, my three roommates decided to treat themselves to a trip to Founding Farmers and indulge in some dessert. Their decision was fairly spontaneous, which meant I already had previous plans. Determined to make me regret my choice, throughout the afternoon they sent me picture after picture of their desserts.  Continue reading “Cake, To-Go Boxes, and Diminishing Marginal Returns”

What You Can’t See, Even When Looking Both Ways

I remember my first car accident vividly. I was making a left hand turn out of the parking lot and didn’t come to a complete stop. I was already turning when I saw the blue F-150 driving straight towards me. I stepped on my brakes. Too late. My body jolted forward as the F-150 hit my little black car. Sitting in the front seat, I tried to contain the rising panic, my hands shaking.  What would my parents think? If only I had waited just half a second longer…

Continue reading “What You Can’t See, Even When Looking Both Ways”

What I Didn’t Know About Adam Smith

Last year, when I was in the horrible, awful process of moving, I had an assortment of unwanted textbooks, clothes, and furniture that combined was worth over $1,000.  I faced two options. I could take pictures of all my items and upload them to eBay or Craiglist or even Facebook Marketplace to sell them for what they were worth. Or I could sell my textbooks to my friend who was taking the same class in the fall at a heavily discounted rate. My pockets would not be as full, but I would be helping out a fellow classmate. Faced with these two options, I texted my friend and sold my textbooks to her.  Combined with a couple other sales, I walked away from my unwanted things for a grand total of little more than $200. Continue reading “What I Didn’t Know About Adam Smith”